Maimonides Middle School Daglanut

Our Curriculum תוכנית הלימודים

Our school's dual curriculum extends from Kindergarten through grade 12, pairing a superlative Torah education with an excellent General Studies program. The result: young men and women who are prepared to be leaders in the modern world while leading lives guided by Halacha -- the Jewish law that they've learned.

Elementary School

Art–All Grades

The Fine Arts curriculum at the Elementary School level begins with the study of the elements of art: line, color, form/shape, space, and texture. Students explore these elements using a variety of media including drawing, painting, printing, clay, and fibers. The use of different outlets allows each student to stretch their creativity and enhances the opportunity for success.

Goals:
• Helping the student learn and understand the elements of art.
• Developing in students the art of imagination and creativity.
• Teaching students to be creative problem solvers.
• Improving skills in the use of and a variety of art materials and processes.
• Assisting students to become appreciators of art.
• Promoting self-worth and understanding ones own abilities.
• Working with classroom teachers to support their curriculum with art.
• Creating projects based on a variety of Jewish holidays (Sukkot, Chanukah, Tu B’ Shevat, Purim) as well as the annual Chagigat HaSiddur and Chagigat HaChumash.
• Including art history in a variety of projects.

Elements:
• Line: pattern making (all grades)
- Vertical, horizontal, and diagonal
- Tesselations
• Color: painting with specific motivation (all grades)
- Mouse-paint
- Magen David color wheel
- Flowers (Georgia O’Keefe)
- Butterfly painting
- Sunset painting with tree
- Insect painting
• Form: portraits (all grades)
- Mask-making (Purim) all grades
- Clay
• Shape:
- Print-making (all grades)
- Collage/montage (all grades)
- Positive and negative shapes
• Space: concept of distance (all grades)
- Big/small
- Near/far
- Foreground/middle ground/background
- One and two point perspective
• Texture
- Weaving (all grades)
- Printing, thumb, shapes, leaf (Gr. K-1)
- Styrofoam etching (Gr. 2-3)
- Softoleum, cutting and printing (Gr. 4-6)

 

Chorus–Grades 1 & 2

Chorus is an optional class that meets during lunch. The 1st and 2nd Grade Chorus meets during lunch on Wednesdays and is open to anyone who would like to join. Students will learn to sing in both unison and harmony, and feel comfortable with both.

Chorus–Grades 3, 4, 5

Chorus is an optional class that meets during lunch. The 3rd-5th Grade Chamber Chorus is an audition-only group, meeting during lunch on Mondays. Students will learn to sing in both unison and harmony, and feel comfortable with both.

Chumash–All Grades

In Kindergarten and Gr. 1, study focuses on Parshat HaShavuah. Students should be able to recall Parsha stories and makes connections between Parshiot.

In Gr. 1-4, we use the Tal Am curriculum which integrates Chumash with holidays and daily life.

Beginning in Gr. 2, students starts a more in-depth study of particular Parshiot. Second grade students learn Lech Lecha and Va-Yeira. A highlight of this year is the Chagigat HaChumash.

In Gr. 3, students work with Chayyei Sarah, Toldedot, and Va-Yishlach and start to read Rashi's script. Pupils should be able to state Rashi's questions and answers.

Fourth grade continues with Va-Yeishev, Mi-Keitz and Va-Yigash while students in Gr. 5 study Shemot, Va-Eira,Bo, Be-Shalach and Yitro.

General Music–Grades K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

General Music is a great way for students to explore music in a variety of ways. We use songs, instruments, and our bodies to learn about music. With a focus on rhythm, intonation, and eventually music reading, students will become comfortable with reading, writing, and listening to music.

Halacha–All Grades

The study of Chagin and Dinim starts with our youngest students. In K, students learn the Hebrew names for ritual objects and learn basic laws and customs of the Chagim as well as appropriate Brachot.Grades 1-4, utilizing the Tal Am curriculum, continue to learn the laws and customs of the Chagim and the meaning behind them.Gr. 5 students use the text Darkenu to study Chagim and learn how to read the text and then, how to apply it to their daily lives.

Hebrew Language (Ivrit)–Grade K

Hebrew instruction begins in our Kindergarten classes. The students become familiar with the Alef-Bet letters, sing songs and listen to stories told by both their Limudei Kodesh teachers and Ivrit enrichment teacher. New words are introduced and reviewed throughout the year. Students engage in many creative projects around the alef bet and Hebrew Vocabulary.

Hebrew language (Ivrit)–Grade 1

Maimonides School is proud to utilize the Tal Am curriculum. This exciting program, created by Tova Shimon and her staff in Montreal, Canada, and generously funded by the Avi Chai Foundation, integrates the Hebrew language curriculum and Limudei Kodesh; it is taught “Ivrit B'ivrit”, in Hebrew. Students devote much time to acquiring the four basic literacy skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. The program utilizes a variety of creative and colorful media to engage students in learning. Educational songs and melodies play a prominent role in the students’ week.A highlight of the year is the Chagigat Hasiddur, during which students and their families celebrate as the children receive their Siddurim and give a beautiful performance in Hebrew. The performance focuses upon themes of the importance of tefillah and how tefillah connects us with Hashem and with Israel. The Chagiga is a life-changing event that helps forge connections with previous generations and with the Mesorah.

Hebrew Language (Ivrit)–Grade 2

Second-graders continue their , Limudei Kodesh studies with Tal Am II, the continuation of the Grade 1 curriculum. As in first grade, the second grade curriculum is taught “Ivrit B'ivrit” (in Hebrew) and integrates the various subjects: Chumash, Parashat Hashavua, Ivrit, and Dinim. Students learn Parashot Hashavua in Hebrew and read texts from beautifully illustrated and carefully constructed chovrot. They learn many new songs and discuss the weather, learn about the Jewish calendar and, of course, learn much about the chagim, Jewish Holidays. Each day each class has a “morning circle” during which discussing both the academics and as well as social/ emotional learning take place. This discussion is also conducted in Hebrew. An important part of the second grade curriculum is reading books and writing book reports. We have added to the Tal Am curriculum additional lessons about the history of the Land of Israel and the State of Israel, from the Biblical times until today. A major event in the lives of our students and their families is the Chagigat HaChumash, receiving of their Chumashim. Students perform cantata in Hebrew that focuses upon the importance of the Torah and Torah study in our lives. As in the first grade, this event helps connect our students and their families in a very powerful way to the Mesorah.

Hebrew language (Ivrit)–Grade 3

Students continue their Limudei Kodesh studies with the Tal Am III program. As with the first two years of the program, Tal Am III integrates the Limudei Kodesh and Hebrew language subjects in a way that is age-appropriate. As in first and second grade, students learn “Ivrit B'ivrit” (in Hebrew). The program regularly uses Hebrew songs and a variety of Hebrew texts. By third grade, students have greatly strengthened their Hebrew language skills.

Hebrew language (Ivrit)–Grade 4

In the fourth grade we use the Chaverim Bivrit curriculum. The program has different levels of colorful and engaging workbooks that match our Hebrew groups. The grade is divided into three different levels in fourth grade. Each level studies Hebrew in a different pace. There is much flexibility in this grouping and students can move easily between levels according to their level of proficiency. Each book from the Chaverim Bivrit series has a different topic; the entire semester focuses upon this subject. Three different themes are focused upon in fourth grade: family photos, after school programs and special artifacts from home. Students read Hebrew texts and answer comprehension questions both orally and in writing. They also write short paragraphs while using correct grammar and spelling. In the fourth grade there are four periods of Ivrit weekly.

Hebrew language (Ivrit)–Grade 5

In fifth grade we continue the Chaverim Bivrit curriculum that we began in fourth grade. Depending on the level, students learn between 2-3 books in Chaverim Bivrit curriculum. In fifth grade, Ivrit is taught for four periods weekly. Students are asked to write paragraphs of greater complexity and length than in previous years, compose songs and poems, read and write newspaper “advertisements” and, of course, speak only in Hebrew. As in previous years, students read at home on a daily basis in order to practice their reading skills. Students have discussions about food and nutrition, hear stories about food and restaurants, and prepare menus for their class restaurant. In the restaurant, students actually order and serve foods as well as dine in the restaurant (all in Hebrew). This is an enjoyable activity that is remembered by Maimonides students for years. It leaves a joyful and satisfying “taste” of Hebrew language with them.

Library and Technology K-5–All Grades

All of our students have regular access to Steg library to take out books and use reference materials. Students in Gr. 3-5 have scheduled time in the computer lab to learn how to access information, conduct research, locate books and find appropriate information on the internet.

Mathematics–Grade K

Essential Elements:

  • Introduction to mathematics vocabulary
  • Identify numbers 0–10
  • Begin to identify numbers 11–31
  • Recognize, copy, and create patterns
  • Rote count by 1’s to 110
  • Count using one-to-one correspondence
  • Skip count by 10’s and 5’s to 50
  • Introduction to number line 
  • Introduction to estimation
  • Introduction to concepts of addition and subtraction 
  • Solve basic addition and subtraction facts using manipulatives
  • Begin to choose and explain strategies for problem-solving
  • Sort objects according to attributes 
  • Create and interpret real and picture graphs
  • Experiences with non-standard measurement
  • Explore standard measurement tools
  • Introduction to time and purpose of clocks, watches
  • Introduction to calendar uses and vocabulary
  • Coin identification and values of penny, nickel, dime
  • Identify basic shapes
  • Recognize the use of numerals in school, home, community
  • Numeral writing 0–9

Mathematics–Grade 1

Essential Elements:

  • Build mathematics vocabulary
  • Identify numbers 11–31
  • Begin to identify numbers 32–110
  • Recognize, copy, and create patterns
  • Rote count by 10’s and 5’s to 110
  • Rote count by 2’s to 20
  • Identify equivalence, greater, less
  • Introduction to odd and even 
  • Experiences with estimation
  • Introduction to place value
  • Addition and subtraction with manipulatives
  • Introduction to addition and subtraction fact families to 18
  • Mastery of addition and subtraction facts to 10
  • Use number line to skip count, add, and subtract
  • Addition with three addends
  • Investigate beginning concept of fractions
  • Select and explain problem-solving strategies
  • Sort according to attributes
  • Tally by 5’s
  • Create and interpret real, picture, and symbolic bar graphs
  • Introduction to standard measurement
  • Time to hour & half hour—analog and digital
  • Expand calendar skills
  • Coin identification and value of quarter, half dollar
  • Count coins to $1.00
  • Make exchanges with coins
  • Shapes and their relationships
  • Investigate beginning concept of probability
  • Recognize the use of numbers and mathematics in school, home, community
  • Introduction to calculator
  • Numeral writing to 110

Mathematics–Grade 2

Essential Elements:

  • Increase mathematics vocabulary
  • Skip count forward and backward by 10’s, 5’s, and 2’s
  • Number relationships through use of hundreds chart
  • Equivalent number names
  • Mastery of odd and even
  • Expand estimation skills
  • Assess reasonableness of answers
  • Master concept of place value through three digits
  • Addition and subtraction with regrouping
  • Mastery of addition and subtraction facts to 18
  • Relationships of basic fractions
  • Devise and explain problem-solving strategies
  • Appreciate the problem-solving strategies of peers
  • Create and interpret symbolic bar graphs
  • Experiences with standard measurement
  • Time to quarter hour and five minute intervals—analog and digital
  • Mastery of basic calendar skills
  • Calculations and relationships using time and calendar
  • Count coins and paper money
  • Expand understanding of shapes and their relationships
  • Introduction to angles, congruency
  • Experiences with prediction and probability
  • Refine calculator skills

Mathematics–Grade 3

Essential Elements:

  • Increase mathematics vocabulary
  • Master concept of place value through four digit numbers
  • Skip count forward and backward by 10’s, 100’s, 1,000’s from a given number
  • Expand use of hundreds chart
  • Addition and subtraction with regrouping of four-digit numbers
  • Decimals to the hundredths place
  • Addition and subtraction of decimals
  • Understand concepts of and relationship between multiplication and division
  • Mastery of multiplication facts to 5’s
  • Multiplication with one-digit multiplier and regrouping
  • Division with single-digit divisor
  • Solve and devise word problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication
  • Devise and explain problem-solving strategies
  • Assess reasonableness of answers
  • Appreciate the problem-solving strategies of peers
  • Rounding to nearest thousand
  • Explore doubling and halving
  • Refine estimation skills
  • Make change from any combination of bills and coins
  • Tell time to minute—analog and digital
  • Calculations and relationships using time and calendar
  • Experiences with standard measurement
  • Create and interpret symbolic bar and line graphs
  • Expand understanding of shapes and their relationships
  • Refine understanding of relationships between fractions
  • Experiences with prediction and probability
  • Refine calculator skills

Mathematics–Grade 4

Essential Elements:

  • Increase mathematics vocabulary
  • Master concept of place value through nine digit numbers
  • Addition and subtraction with regrouping of six-digit numbers
  • Subtraction and trading with consecutive zeros
  • Addition and subtraction of decimals
  • Compare and order decimals
  • Rounding of decimals
  • Fraction terminology
  • Fraction and decimal equivalence
  • Comparing, ordering, reducing fractions
  • Addition and subtraction of fractions and mixed numbers with like denominators
  • Master concept of relationship between multiplication and division
  • Mastery of multiplication facts to 12’s
  • Multiplication with two-digit multiplier and regrouping
  • Mastery of division facts to 5’s
  • Division with two-digit divisor
  • Solve and devise word problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication, division
  • Devise and explain problem-solving strategies
  • Assess reasonableness of answers
  • Appreciate the problem-solving strategies of peers
  • Using multiples to solve problems
  • Rounding to nearest million
  • Refine estimation skills
  • Calculations and relationships using money, time, and calendar
  • Measurement and negative numbers
  • Create and interpret graphs
  • Expand understanding of shapes, lines, line segments and their relationships
  • Experiences with prediction, statistics, and probability
  • Refine calculator skills

Mathematics–Grade 5

Essential Elements:

  • Increase mathematics vocabulary
  • Mastery of operations with whole numbers
  • Operations with decimals
  • Mastery of division facts to 12’s
  • Mastery of long division
  • Data analysis and statistics
  • Fractions and number theory
  • Operations with fractions
  • Integers and rational numbers
  • Expressions and equations
  • Experiences with ratio, proportion, and percent
  • Solve and devise word problems
  • Devise and explain problem-solving strategies
  • Assess reasonableness of answers
  • Appreciate the problem-solving strategies of peers
  • Multiples
  • Explore doubling and halving
  • Refine estimation skills
  • Geometry and plane figures
  • Geometry and measurement
  • Refine understanding of relationships between fractions
  • Statistics and probability
  • Coordinate graphing, equations, and integers
  • Refine calculator skills

Navi (Prophets)–Grades 4 & 5

Grade 4—Yehoshua The study of Navi begins in the fourth grade with the book of Joshua. The emphasis is upon the storyline, textual skills, and making connections between themes in the Chumash and the Navi, and application to the students' daily lives. The key stories are covered in depth. The lists of conquests are learned in summary. There is extensive use of maps and other visual aids.Grade 5—Shoftim The Book of Judges continues several of the themes of the book of Joshua. One of those themes, which becomes even more prominent in the Book of Judges and represents the major theme of the book is the cycle of sin, punishment, teshuva, sinning again. Teachers focus on this cycle throughout our study of the book. In addition, students further develop textual skills, and teachers and students extensively discuss philosophical issues dealing with sin and punishment and other themes. Students also study traditional commentaries, and utilize archaeological and other modern resources. There is an emphasis upon personal application of the lessons learned. The fifth grade, as well as the Elementary School Limudei Kodesh experience, culminates with a special siyum at the conclusion of this book.

Physical Education–All Grades

Physical Education is an important part of the Maimonides Elementary School curicullum.Instruction for students in K-Gr. 2, focuses on general skills and movement. Activities include: hula hoops, bowling, volleyball, track, kickball, soccer, dance, pillo polo and basketball. Sportsmanship, cooperation and teamwork are emphasized throughout all activities.Students in Gr. 3-5 learn new games/sports in multi-week units which include: soccer, speedball, basketball, floor hockey and pillo polo. Each unit focuses on skill development as well as an emphasis on teamwork and strategy. A highlight of the program is the end-of-the-year Color War event.

Reading & Language Arts–All Grades

In the early years, the seeds for successful learning are planted. Through the Elementary School’s reading and language arts program, we endeavor to give children not only the foundation they need, but also to inspire them. Our dual goal is to teach students solid skills in reading, writing, and speaking, as well as to produce readers, writers, and speakers who joyfully express themselves and understand and appreciate the ideas of others.

Reading
Children learn to read in different ways and at their own pace. The reading curriculum at Maimonides School is designed to respond to those individual differences using a variety of creative strategies in a balanced literacy program. Phonics and comprehension are both emphasized, along with oral fluency and the building of vocabulary. Students may work in flexible small groups, with partners, or in large group activities. They enjoy reading a wide range of materials from many genres including fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. In the primary grades, a reading specialist supports the classes as they build reading skills. In the intermediate grades, reading activities are often integrated with the social studies or science curriculum. When possible, students at all age levels are offered opportunities to make choices about reading materials and about their responses to them. Overall, the goal of the Elementary School reading curriculum is to promote a love of reading, as well as the confidence to use reading to learn independently.

Writing/Spelling/Vocabulary/Oral Language/Listening
Students develop writing skills through journal writing, crafting original books and poems, and other open-ended activities. Some pieces are edited and students learn to use standard spelling and punctuation. Research and report writing are introduced in Grade 3, and these skills are refined in subsequent grades through regular responses to books and through social studies and science projects. By Grade 5, students begin to develop their own voice and can recognize the elements of good writing. Spelling and vocabulary skills are acquired and strengthened through explicit instruction, as well as through student reading and writing. Frequent opportunities are provided to share ideas orally, helping students gain confidence in expressing themselves. Attention is also given to developing students as respectful, active listeners to the ideas of peers and adults.

Handwriting/Keyboarding
Systematic handwriting instruction is provided to help students learn and refine these skills. The Handwriting Without Tears method is used in Kindergarten to introduce the letters, and Zaner-Bloser materials are used for instruction in the other elementary grades. Both cursive writing and keyboarding skills are introduced in Grade 3, providing students with the tools to express their ideas. These skills are polished and fluency is attained through regular use, for meaningful writing, in the upper intermediate grades.

Introduction to English for Speakers of Other Languages
Maimonides School is a diverse and vibrant community. As the oldest and largest Jewish day school in Boston, we have nearly 70 years of experience in helping students acquire English language skills. Teachers are able provide a variety of creative materials and activities to immerse children in English, while at the same time celebrating the languages spoken in students’ homes. Most of all, Maimonides faculty and students are welcoming and encouraging to students who are newer speakers of English, providing a climate which promotes rapid and sustained language learning.

Science–Grades 3, 4, 5

The Maimonides elementary science curriculum incorporates the eight categories of the National Science Education Standards—unifying concepts and processes in science, science as inquiry, physical science, life science, earth and space science, science and technology, science in personal and social perspectives, and history and nature of science. At all grade levels, the program of study is designed to help students gain understanding through inquiry. By generating questions, and then working together to seek answers, students are engaged in learning science in a way that reflects how science actually works. Collaboration and teamwork are an integral part of the Maimonides hands-on science experience. As students pose questions about the natural world and investigate phenomena together, they develop an excitement about science. They also broaden their skills in observing and recording data, and in making predictions and drawing conclusions. This combination of excitement and content knowledge creates a strong foundation for future science learning.

Themes
Most science learning in the Elementary School is thematic. Where appropriate, science learning is integrated with other subject areas such as Limudei Kodesh,mathematics, social studies, or writing. As Kindergarteners learn about the life cycle of frogs, they read many books, write in journals, sing songs, and do art activities, all related to tadpoles and frogs. In science, grades 3-5 have a circular curriculum: each grade learns topics that are related to one another, but build on their prior knowledge of that topic. In grades 3-5, everyone learns about weather, forms of energy, and living things and our environment. This provides students with an opportunity to become experts in these three specific areas instead of just knowing a little from many areas.

  • Weather (September): The third grade focuses on the water cycle where they conduct several experiments on precipitation, evaporation and condensation. Students create clouds with dry ice, make their own rain gauges, and compare the evaporation rate of different liquids. Fourth grade students learn about weather instrumentsm and begin thinking like meteorologists. They learn about the different tools used to measure temperature, air pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction. Students conduct their own daily observation of the weather using thermometers, barometers, sling psychrometers, anemometers and weather vane. The fifth grade focuses on severe weather: warm and cold fronts and the weather each brings, hurricanes and tornadoes and the causes of both.
  • Forms of Energy (January): The third grade begins to study light and sound. Students find out how light bounces, perform several experiments with mirrors, and create their own periscope! Students also find out how light bends in order for white light to be divided into color -- experimenting with prisms, kaleidoscopes and sunlight. Lastly, they explore the colors of light in detail, construct a color wheel to observe how light colors combine, and compare the color properties of light with pigment. The fourth grade begins to study electrical energy through static electricity and circuits. They learn about neutral, positive and negative charges and test several materials to see which ones create charges. They also use static electricity to separate salt from pepper, light neon lights, and make rice krispies jump! After static electricity, students focus on electricity through building open, closed, parallel and series circuits. The fifth grade begins to learn about the six simple machines (lever, wheel and axle, pulley, inclined plane, screw and wedge), using everyday materials to build levers, pulleys, and wheel-and-axles. Students see how levers make work easier by using a spring scale and testing out the force and distance of first, second, and third class levers. Towards the end of the unit, students put together their own machine/invention using several simple machines.
  • Living Things and our Environment (April): The third grade begins to learn about plants. They plant seeds from different types of plants that have varying height, color and hairiness, then measure, graph, name and describe their own unique plants. They also discover that plants need the proper amount of nutrition to be healthy, and are introduced to the fascinating world of hydroponics. The fourth grade begins to learn about soil and decomposers through hands-on explorations about the different layers of soil, the different textures and the different uses. They investigate organic decomposition, scavengers, fungi, and bacteria through a unit called "Nature’s Recyclers." The fifth grade has six sessions exploring rocketry with George Kirby. They build their own rockets and understand how rockets work through the study of aerodynamics. The remaining class time is devoted to studying animals and their food chains. Students analyze animal remains to determine food chains and energy flow. Later, they apply their knowledge by constructing an ecological pyramid based on the foods they themselves eat.

Science Fair
In addition to our regular curriculum, grades 3-5 are responsible for developing a science fair project. Each year, the science fair has a different theme, which creates a focused environment. Students design experimental projects in school which they will later test and report back on the results. The science fair is held in school for parents and students to see the students’ hard work.

Science Lab
The Elementary School is fortunate to have a dedicated, state-of-the-art science lab for use by Grades 3-6. Younger students also visit the lab a few times each year. Equipped with SMARTBoard interactive computer technology, the lab has live animals, special plant grow-lights, and a myriad of other equipment and materials designed to enhance student experiences.

Talmud–Grade 5

Grade 5 Students use the first year of the “Vishanantam” curriculum, as developed in Israel by Rabbi Pinchas Hayman. This curriculum includes an introduction to the ”Chain of Tradition” with great emphasis on the historical background of each of the periods leading up to and including the Talmudic period. Teachers explain key foundational concepts in Talmud study. Students learn and memorize selected mishnayot, and analyze them in terms of the historical elements and content. Students use the “Bonayich” website to further enhance their knowledge of the mishnayot and the historical background.

Middle School

Arabic–Grade 8

The Beginning Arabic course will provide students with a basic introduction to the Arabic language, with a focus on the dialect spoken in Israel. The class will draw on the similarities of  Hebrew and Arabic to teach vocabulary and grammar and also to highlight the historical link between the two languages. Students will begin learning the four primary language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

By the end of the course students will have mastered the Arabic script and learned basic grammatical concepts such as verb conjugation and agreement, and begin building vocabulary. They will be able to read street signs in Israel, read and write simple Arabic texts, and conduct basic conversations with Arabic speakers. We will cover topics such as greetings, weather, telling time, shopping and hobbies. They will also leave the course with a greater understanding of Arabic society and culture.

Chumash –Grade 6

The course description for Grade 6 Chumash is currently being updated to reflect program changes and enhancements.

Chumash –Grade 7

Text: Vayikra. The focus is on Parashat Kedoshim with its many important mitzvot. The rationale and details of these mitzvot are explored. Students are taught to use “text decoding” strategies to break down, translate and understand psukim as well as Rashi commentaries. We will also to discuss what it means to be a person who strives to live a life full of mitzvot.

Chumash –Grade 8

Text: Devarim. Students continue in their development of reading and comprehension skills. With its many flashbacks, Devarim serves to review and reinforce many of the ideas they have studied in previous years. The message of the narrative and the mitzvot presented here is discussed.

English–Grade 6

Grade 6 English is comprised of both a reading and writing program. The reading program strives to encourage students to utilize a variety of strategies for accessing and exploring literature. Using Literature Circles, the class reads "Quake" by Gail Langer Karwosky. The students read two to three chapters per week, and each week, they have a “job” that they do based on the reading for that week. These jobs support reading comprehension by using various strategies that help the students interact with and make connections to the text.

The other literature for the course comes from the Junior Great Books anthology. Stories are read aloud and then the students do a second reading on their own or in groups, where they look for, and mark certain passages that we may focus on later. Skills such as "Directed Notes" and "Shared Inquiry" are modeled for the students.

In sixth grade writing we combine the writing process with the Six Traits of Writing. We have mini-lessons on the various steps of the writing process – Brainstorming, Drafting, Editing (self, peer, teacher), Revising, Final Edit, and Publishing, as well as on the Six Traits of Writing – Ideas, Organization, Voice, Sentence Fluency, Word Choice, Conventions plus Publishing which is also considered to be a Trait. The students utilize class time to write in their writing journals. We encourage (and teach) the use of a “writer’s notebook,” to try new (not tired) words in their writing. We teach how to write in paragraphs, and we introduce a rubric of the six traits as well, so students can monitor their own writing. The writing process culminates in a “publishing party,” where the students read their stories to each other, and then have an “open mic” session where they read selected passages out loud to the whole group. Last year, we had five publishing parties, including our “Poetry Slam” following our poetry unit, where the students read their original poetry to the whole middle school. The writing process provides stimulation for the children’s voices to emerge as writers. They become comfortable with writing and they produce work that they value and own. We continue to use the writing process and writing traits rubric when we approach other genres of writing and when we encounter different genres in our reading. Additionally, we work closely with the other sixth grade teachers to inform them about what we are doing, and to promote writing across the curriculum.

English–Grade 7

Seventh grade English class is supported by four major pillars: reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary.

For many 7th grade students, the titles on this year’s syllabus represent their first exposure to classic texts written for adults including works by John Steinbeck, Jack London, Lorraine Hansberry, George Orwell, and Arthur Conan Doyle. To ease this transition, our first novel is the young adult classic, The Outsiders.

Through our examination of classic texts (including novels, short stories, and a play) students will learn about elements of plot, theme, and characterization, and will demonstrate that understanding orally and in writing.

Our writing studies have a concentration on mystery via a study of The Hound of the Baskervilles, and allegory via Animal Farm. Students will be familiar with and demonstrate their understanding of the writing process, of six major writing traits and of various types of writing. They will learn a variety of grammatical conventions and will increase their vocabulary to be able to use in their writing between 200-300 vocabulary words. In addition, 7th graders will learn various facets of poetry, will compose poems, and will perform poetic pieces of their own composition and others.

English–Grade 8

Our reading and writing encompasses the theme Perspective. In literature, students will use literary concepts including theme, metaphor, imagery, and characterization to deepen understanding of texts. They will learn how to read “beneath and between the lines" and discuss texts (speak and listen) in a respectful and inquisitive way. Our syllabus includes To Kill a Mockingbird, Night and Fahrenheit 451.

In grammar, vocabulary, and writing, students will learn how to recognize and correct common grammatical errors in context as well as how to transfer skills learned in grammar mini-lessons to their own writing. Students will also create poetry, personal vignettes, and short stories and will practice expository writing through extemporaneous in-class and planned multi-draft essays. Eighth graders will know what a thesis statement is, how to write a strong one, and how to use quotations from the text to prove a thesis.

Hebrew Language –Grade 6

Beginning in sixth grade, students study the innovative NETA curriculum that was developed by Hila Kobliner of Hebrew College in Newton, MA and generously funded by the Avi Chai Foundation.

Students are grouped by levels, based on a placement exam that tests for Hebrew language proficiency. The course, which is taught in Hebrew, meets four times each week.

In some classes, students are “introduced” to Israeli teenagers by watching them in specially made educational movies that are part of the NETA curriculum. It is interesting to see Jewish life of Israelis, based on vocabulary and grammatical structures dealt with in the book. The program incorporates both traditional, as well as Modern sources. For example, students study Midrashim and Perakim from the Tanach, discussing various ideas from each chapter. The curriculum integrates themes from Torah, Medinat Yisrael, and Israeli culture.

Sixth graders are grouped into two levels based on proficiency.

Level I Students who complete this level will be able to:

  • Speak: in short dialogues about daily life or customs (acquaintances, school, schedule of the day, Shabbat, Holidays)
  • Write: a paragraph on a personal topic (description, information, impression, a memo, an assertion of opinion)
  • Read: a paragraph of information or a description, a story or a folk tale
  • Listen: comprehend a short dialogue about daily life, summarize a short informative lecture on places, customs, groups of people and social phenomena

Level II Students who complete this level will be able to:

  • Speak: in dialogues about school, family, entertainment, personal preference, the weather, or place description; ask questions in an interview, answer and report; express an opinion and support the opinion with reasons
  • Write: short notes (greeting, apology, thanks, invitation), a personal letter, an impersonal letter (announcement, request, report)
  • Read: comprehend an informative paragraph; an opinion supported by reasons; a short story, general comprehension of a simple poem, or a few biblical verses
  • Listen: comprehend a short dialogue about daily life; generally comprehend a simple song; comprehend a short informative lecture about modern life, tradition and habits

Hebrew Language –Grade 7

Beginning in sixth grade, students study the innovative NETA curriculum that was developed by Hila Kobliner of Hebrew College in Newton, MA and generously funded by the Avi Chai Foundation.

Students are grouped by levels, based on a placement exam that tests for Hebrew language proficiency. The course, which is taught in Hebrew, meets four times each week.

In some classes, students are “introduced” to Israeli teenagers by watching them in specially made educational movies that are part of the NETA curriculum. It is interesting to see Jewish life of Israelis, based on vocabulary and grammatical structures dealt with in the book. The program incorporates both traditional, as well as Modern sources. For example, students study Midrashim and Perakim from the Tanach, discussing various ideas from each chapter. The curriculum integrates themes from Torah, Medinat Yisrael, and Israeli culture.

Sixth graders are grouped into two levels based on proficiency.

Level I Students who complete this level will be able to:

  • Speak: in short dialogues about daily life or customs (acquaintances, school, schedule of the day, Shabbat, Holidays)
  • Write: a paragraph on a personal topic (description, information, impression, a memo, an assertion of opinion)
  • Read: a paragraph of information or a description, a story or a folk tale
  • Listen: comprehend a short dialogue about daily life, summarize a short informative lecture on places, customs, groups of people and social phenomena

Level II Students who complete this level will be able to:

  • Speak: in dialogues about school, family, entertainment, personal preference, the weather, or place description; ask questions in an interview, answer and report; express an opinion and support the opinion with reasons
  • Write: short notes (greeting, apology, thanks, invitation), a personal letter, an impersonal letter (announcement, request, report)
  • Read: comprehend an informative paragraph; an opinion supported by reasons; a short story, general comprehension of a simple poem, or a few biblical verses
  • Listen: comprehend a short dialogue about daily life; generally comprehend a simple song; comprehend a short informative lecture about modern life, tradition and habits

Hebrew Language –Grade 8

Beginning in sixth grade, students study the innovative NETA curriculum that was developed by Hila Kobliner of Hebrew College in Newton, MA and generously funded by the Avi Chai Foundation.

Students are grouped by levels, based on a placement exam that tests for Hebrew language proficiency. The course, which is taught in Hebrew, meets four times each week.

In some classes, students are “introduced” to Israeli teenagers by watching them in specially made educational movies that are part of the NETA curriculum. It is interesting to see Jewish life of Israelis, based on vocabulary and grammatical structures dealt with in the book. The program incorporates both traditional, as well as Modern sources. For example, students study Midrashim and Perakim from the Tanach, discussing various ideas from each chapter. The curriculum integrates themes from Torah, Medinat Yisrael, and Israeli culture.

Sixth graders are grouped into two levels based on proficiency.

Level I Students who complete this level will be able to:

  • Speak: in short dialogues about daily life or customs (acquaintances, school, schedule of the day, Shabbat, Holidays)
  • Write: a paragraph on a personal topic (description, information, impression, a memo, an assertion of opinion)
  • Read: a paragraph of information or a description, a story or a folk tale
  • Listen: comprehend a short dialogue about daily life, summarize a short informative lecture on places, customs, groups of people and social phenomena

Level II Students who complete this level will be able to:

  • Speak: in dialogues about school, family, entertainment, personal preference, the weather, or place description; ask questions in an interview, answer and report; express an opinion and support the opinion with reasons
  • Write: short notes (greeting, apology, thanks, invitation), a personal letter, an impersonal letter (announcement, request, report)
  • Read: comprehend an informative paragraph; an opinion supported by reasons; a short story, general comprehension of a simple poem, or a few biblical verses
  • Listen: comprehend a short dialogue about daily life; generally comprehend a simple song; comprehend a short informative lecture about modern life, tradition and habits

History - United States History–Grade 7

This survey course familiarizes students with the highlights of United States history as they are exposed to a comprehensive study of the complete story of one nation. Following a timeline of events that begins in 1492, students cover the establishment of the North American colonies, the movement for independence from Europe and the foundations of our modern democracy and constitutional government. The course touches on the significant events and topics that continued to shape the growing nation—Civil War and Reconstruction, immigration, international relations, industrialization, civil rights and race relations, and the nation's increasing role as a world economic, political, and military power. Central to this study is the development of skills in reading primary and secondary sources, mapping, analyzing information, problem solving, and understanding the political process. Students complete various projects and present their research in a variety of ways.

Mathematics–Grade 6

Essential Elements of Grade 6 Mathematics:

  • To identify and classify polygons
  • To construct, measure and classify angles
  • To find the circumference of a circle given its radius or diameter
  • To classify numbers as prime or composite and to identify their factors; to write numbers as a product of their factors
  • To identify common multiples and common factors, including the LCM and GCF, of pairs of numbers
  • To convert fractions into decimals and vice versa; to classify decimals as repeating or terminating; to multiply and divide decimals
  • To multiply and divide fractions; to interpret fractions as division
  • To understand integer concepts, including opposite and absolute value
  • To write and compute positive exponents and square roots, including powers of 10
  • To use the order of operations in applied settings
  • To solve algebraic equations in one variable
  • To identify patterns that are linear relationships from a table of values or an applied context; to write rules and expressions using variables
  • To write and compare simple ratios and proportions; to apply similarity and proportion to geometric figures
  • To write and compute percentages; to find the whole given the percentage.

Mathematics - Algebra 1–Grade 8

This course covers a wide range of first-year algebra topics. Specific topics include evaluation of algebraic expressions, exponents, roots, properties of real numbers, absolute value, scientific notation, linear equations in one, two, and three unknowns, polynomials, rational expressions, word problems, the Pythagorean Theorem, function notation and functions, solutions of quadratic equations, direct and inverse variation, and coordinate geometry.

Navi–Grade 6

In Sixth Grade Navi, we study Sefer Shmuel Alef with the primary goal of understanding Jewish leadership and the lessons we can learn from the different types of leaders presented in this captivating story. We delve into the life of Shmuel HaNavi, and address such questions as: What in Shmuel HaNavi’s life enabled him to attain the status of a prophet? What were Shmuel’s accomplishments? What were his challenges as a leader? As we progress through the sefer, we learn about the Jewish people’s first king, Saul. We discuss the differences between a Navi (prophet) and a melech (king), and we reflect on the relationship between Shmuel and Saul. We then encounter the young David, who becomes anointed as king even before Saul’s demise. We explore and analyze the growing tension between David and Saul, and we derive life lessons from this analysis. The students learn the text in Ivrit, and study elements of Ivrit Mikrait (Biblical Hebrew grammar), toward the goal of being better able to learn Tanakh independently. We begin to dabble in the medieval parshanim (exegetes) as well in order to enhance our understanding of the text.

Navi–Grade 7

In Seventh Grade Navi, we study Sefer Shmuel Bet with the dual goals of strengthening our textual skills, and engaging in analysis of the continuing story of David HaMelech. We build on the linguistic and exegetical skills of the previous year, and we add layers to each of these strands. We utilize the peirush of the Malbim and the Abarbanel to tackle such issues as: How does David become king? What are his challenges as a leader? What are his personal traits that we can emulate? What are David’s accomplishments? What factors contribute to David’s decline in power and control over his people and country? All of these questions form the basis of lively discussion and debate throughout the year. The students learn to bring support from the text, and to see a problem from multiple vantage points.

Navi–Grade 8

Text: Melachim Alef, Megilat Kohelet, selected Tehillim and Mishlei. Students study about the passing of King David, King Solomon and his triumphs and shortcomings, the building of the first Beit HaMikdash, the division of the kingdom upon Solomon's death, and the conflicts between the wicked King Ahab and Elijah the prophet. Students learn how the prophet identifies cause-and-effect incidents. Reading and comprehension of the text is emphasized. Our goals are:

  • Familiarize students with the text
  • Increase biblical vocabulary
  • Identify and appreciate structure, themes and patterns
  • Exploring parshanut and share our thoughts

Non-Western Cultures–Grade 8

This course is designed to enable students to explore the history and culture of any society. After initial instruction in those topics common to all groups—geography, history, family, religion, economics, politics and culture—students will use these general tools and engage in area studies. Area studies include, depending on time and interest, Africa, India, China, Japan and South America. Students will hone skills in mapping, basic research and essay development.

Pre-Algebra & Algebra–Grade 7

This course represents the culmination of the study of pre-algebra mathematics. Students completing the text should be well-versed in the following areas: fractions, decimals, mixed numbers, signed numbers, arithmetic operations involving all forms of numbers, order of operations, percents, proportions, ratios, divisibility, rounding, place value, unit conversion, scientific notation, and word problems involving algebraic concepts. Students will be introduced to rudimentary algebra topics such as evaluation of algebraic expressions, the simplification of algebraic expressions and the solution of linear equations in one unknown. Also included are geometric concepts and topics such as perimeter, area, surface area, volume and classification of geometric figures.

Science –Grade 6

Our 6th graders study Earth Science for the full year. Students explore the air around them and the importance of the atmosphere through hands-on experiments. They are engaged in learning about different climates around the world and make connections between science and social studies. Students move from the air to the ground by studying landforms and the Earth's changing surface. Lastly, students dive below Earth's surface to study rocks and minerals.

Science –Grade 7

The seventh grade explores living systems. Students come to recognize and appreciate that systems exist in and among living organisms, and maintain a dynamic balance. These systems range in magnitude from ecosystems to a single organism, and down to the cellular level.

We will explore the realm of genetics and heredity: Why do living things change over time, and how is information passed from generation to generation?  Students will deepen their understanding of the Scientific Method and use these skills to produce formal lab reports, as well as design and execute an in-depth experiment for Science Fair. As a culmination to the curriculum, we will study the major organ systems of the human body, leaving with an appreciation of the infinitely complex and interrelated web of balances that exist within and among us.

Science –Grade 8

In 8th grade, students use the metric system to quantitatively and qualitatively explore physical science concepts about the matter, energy and forces in our universe. After using inquiry-based scientific methods to learn about properties of matter and chemical reactions, students will create models of extremely small phenomena such as atoms to help develop an understanding of how things work. It will be especially interesting to decipher the code that lies within the Periodic Table of Elements and use it to uncover many mysteries of the universe.

Students will collaborate on projects, exploring their scientific interests in great detail and applying their knowledge and creativity in a meaningful way to positively impact their community.

Social Studies–Grade 6

In sixth grade, students focus on two areas -- maps and the Middle Ages.

Map study includes acquisition of knowledge and skills specific to working with maps as well as those related to geography.

In this course, students will learn the parts of a map, types of maps, and map terms.  In addition, students will understand the physical and political features of the world and the five themes of geography (location, place, human-environment interaction, movement, regions).  Students will be able to interpret the biases of mapmakers, and design their own maps to convey their own story.

The study of the Middle Ages includes both a focus upon the historic period and the knowledge and skills more generally related to the study of history.  During their time studying the Middle Ages, students will understand feudalism, the religious and political motivations for conflict, the chivalric ideal, and the rise of cities, including how cities led to an increased susceptibility to disease.  In a more general sense, students will learn how to read a textbook to obtain knowledge, how to take effective notes, and how to do research and report their findings.

Spanish –Grade 8

The first year of Spanish introduces students to Spanish language and culture. Students practice proper pronunciation and accent. The elements of conversation—verbs, vocabulary, grammar and idioms are taught using dialogues, games, stories, DVDs, and videos. At the end of the first year, students will be able to converse in the present and the progressive future tenses of regular and selected irregular verbs. They will also know some past tense forms and will be able to talk and write about themselves, their home, school and community.

Talmud–Grade 6

In Grade 6, we continue with elements of the “Vishanantam” curriculum begun in Grade 5. We study the mishnayot of Masechet Megillah. Students learn to identify the various opinions in the mishna and to derive the halachot from the mishna. Teachers explain key Talmudic terminology. Classes study historical elements as well as content. Additional teacher-prepared introductions to Torah Sheb'al Peh further enhance the published curricular materials. Zurat hadaf as well as the continuation of shalshelet hakabala (“Chain of Tradition”) down to contemporary poskim are emphasized.

Talmud–Grade 7

Text: In seventh grade we learn perek Tefillat HaShachar in Mesechet Brachot. We focus on exposing the students to Gemara. The practical and relatively straight forward nature of the perek serves as a great introduction to Gemara. They begin to develop their Gemara skills while learning about familiar topics in Tefillah. They learn about the format of the page as well as Rashi and Tosfot and begin to develop their Talmud vocabulary.

Talmud–Grade 8

In 8th grade, we learn Perek Hamafkid in Mesechet Metziah. We build on the skills we began to develop in 7th grade with the goal of preparing the students for high school. With this perek, students are introduced to more complex Gemara structures so they can develop their analytical thinking. The master key Gemara terms as well as common Gemara vocabulary.

Upper School

Arabic–Grade 10

Intermediate Arabic 2 will build upon the skills acquired in Intermediate Arabic 1, advancing student proficiency in both formal and spoken Arabic.

Using the Al-Kitab text and printed Arabic media sources, students will significantly expand their vocabulary and improve their reading and writing skills through the study of complex grammatical structures including past and future tenses, superlatives, comparatives, negations, and construct phrases. The use of Arabic root-based dictionaries will also be taught and students will begin to use them in class. Students will advance their listening comprehension skills using Al-Kitab sound and video files as well as selections of Arabic audio media.

Significant attention will also be given to developing and practicing oral communication skills. Upon completion of the course, students will have the basic critical skills necessary to manage in Arabic-speaking environments including asking for directions and assistance, purchasing goods, and discussing basic political ideas.

Arabic–Grade 9

Intermediate Arabic 1 will build upon the basic skills acquired in Beginning Arabic, advancing student proficiency in both formal and spoken Arabic. Through exposure to Israeli and other Middle Eastern news sources, students will be introduced to complex grammatical structures, expand their vocabulary, and advance their listening and reading comprehension skills. Students will continue to practice and develop their oral communication skills and gain greater exposure to Arab society, culture and history.

The class will continue to draw upon students’ prior knowledge of Hebrew, Israeli culture and Middle Eastern current events.

Upon completion of the course students will be able to understand the main points of short news broadcasts and newspaper articles, construct more complex sentences (written and spoken) and converse more fluidly with Arabic speakers about themselves, their families, their surroundings, and travel. They will also be familiar with basic political vocabulary.

Chumash –Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

All classes study the same text on a four-year cycle. Two years is devoted to the study of Bereishit, with one year each for the study of Shemot and Bamidbar. Students hone their skills at reading and understanding the text, and then learn to analyze the commentaries of Rashi, Rambam, and other classical commentaries. Relevant source material is presented from Talmud and Midrash to round out the students' understanding of the topic.

This material is taught in increasing depth and sophistication in the upper grades. The degree of complexity with which it is presented and developed depends on the specific grade and section. As a general rule, ninth grade aims to consolidate the study skills developed in the Middle School grades. These include: mechanical reading, acquisition of a core vocabulary, and exposure to the commentary of Rashi and occasionally other meforshim. Tenth grade studies the commentary of Rambam and other meforshim. Students discover the textual and/or logical bases for the different viewpoints of meforshim. Eleventh grade deals with the role of Midrashic interpretation of the text, and analyzes the text in a more sophisticated manner. The twelfth grade consolidates these skills, with students expected to engage in independent Chumash study on a relevant topic.

English - AP English Literature–Grade 12

An AP English Literature and Composition course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use languageto provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone.Qualified students are considered for this section based on their previous grades and writing samples. Students taking this course should be prepared to present independent work in one-on-one conferences with the instructor and will be prepared to take the AP English Literature exam in May.

English I–Grade 9

Building on the literary skills introduced in the Middle School, the ninth-grade English course develops and enhances the students' ability to read and analyze literature, and to express ideas with logic and clarity both verbally and in writing. Freshmen study mythology, the Greek epic poem, and contemporary literature, and chart the evolution of tragedy as genre through their study of Greek, Elizabethan, and modern drama. Emphasis is placed upon the stylistic and thematic influences of Homer, Sophocles, and Shakespeare, upon the far-reaching influences of mythology on both traditional and contemporary literature, and upon overarching themes—such as the hero's journey—from the classical to the modern period. In composition, priority is given to the formulation of the thesis paper in which students support a literary argument. Other assignments stress research skills. In-class, timed writing exercises help students learn to think and to write under pressure. Grammatical topics covered include verb tense, subject-verb agreement, pronoun-antecedent agreement, and phrases. (Various topics covered in the freshman English course are coordinated with those studied in social studies.)

English II–Grade 10

Sophomore English is designed to introduce students to a wide variety of literature and to instill an intellectual appreciation of such major writers as William Shakespeare, Jonathan Swift, Zora Neale Hurston, and J.D. Salinger. Emphasis is placed upon the influences such authors have had on world literature via their thematic and stylistic methods. Tenth graders study many literary genres, including satire, poetry, comedy, and tragedy. They are exposed to an array of social, political, and thematic issues, and examine their evolution. Close attention is paid to the wide spectrum of literary devices employed by various writers, in addition to understanding the literary periods from the Elizabethan Age to the modern day.

English III–Grade 11

The scope of the eleventh-grade course, with the exception of Shakespeare's Hamlet, is American literature, with the study of works by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Flannery O'Conner and T.S Eliot, to name just a few.

We also work on continuing mastery of the expository essay form by exploring compelling thesis positions, use of specific examples and the vocabulary of literary analysis.

Students will write several rough drafts of a paper to revise clarity and depth of content or to edit style and mechanics and will learn how to provide thoughtful, insightful peer feedback using descriptive rubrics.

In addition, students will be able to practice the essay section of the SAT.

English Literature–Grade 12

The primary goal of the senior course is to prepare students for the demands of college level writing, reading, and analytical thinking. The syllabus includes works which are some of the major building blocks of Western literature: Kafka's Metamorphosis, Bronte's Jane Eyre, Shakespeare's King Lear, and many others. Particularly close attention is paid to analyzing texts in a sociopolitical and philosophical context. Moving beyond the confines of classroom analysis, students are exposed to literary criticism and to the works of contemporary essayists. By year's end, students will be expected to read with a broader critical understanding and to have furthered their abilities to write with clarity and economy. This course is offered at the CORE college preparatory and Accelerated levels. Qualified students are also prepared for the Advanced Placement Examination in English.

Environmental Science–Grade 12

This course explores the multidisciplinary science of the environment with an emphasis on green chemistry and remediation techniques. We will focus on contemporary issues such as air and water pollution, global climate change, ozone depletion, acid rain, hazardous and solid waste, alternative energy, soils, deforestation, over-fishing, biodiversity and endangered species, and their ecological, economic and human health impacts. This course is offered at the CORE college preparatory level.

Geometry –Grade 10

Students study geometric figures, geometric proofs, and the application of arithmetic and algebra to solve geometric problems. Topics covered include basic geometric vocabulary and notation, two column proofs, congruent triangles, parallelism, perpendicularity, polygons, similarity, the Pythagorean Theorem, circles, area and volume. Some classes also study loci and construction problems.

Hebrew (Gr. 9-11)–Grades 9, 10, 11

Beginning in sixth grade, students study the innovative NETA curriculum that was developed by Hila Kobliner of Hebrew College in Newton, MA and generously funded by the Avi Chai Foundation.

Students are grouped by levels, based on a placement exam that tests for Hebrew language proficiency. The course, which is taught in Hebrew, meets four times each week.

In some classes, students are “introduced” to Israeli teenagers by watching them in specially made educational movies that are part of the NETA curriculum. It is interesting to see Jewish life of Israelis, based on vocabulary and grammatical structures dealt with in the book. The program incorporates both traditional, as well as Modern sources. For example, students study Midrashim and Perakim from the Tanach, discussing various ideas from each chapter. The curriculum integrates themes from Torah, Medinat Yisrael, and Israeli culture. Freshman are grouped into three levels based on proficiency.

Beginner Students who complete this level will be able to:

  • Speak: in short dialogues about daily life or customs (acquaintances, school, schedule of the day, Shabbat, Holidays)
  • Write: a paragraph on a personal topic (description, information, impression, a memo, an assertion of opinion)
  • Read: a paragraph of information or a description, a story or a folk tale
  • Listen: comprehend a short dialogue about daily life, summarize a short informative lecture on places, customs, groups of people and social phenomena

Advanced Beginners Students who complete this level will be able to:

  • Speak: in dialogues about school, family, entertainment, personal preference, the weather, or place description; ask questions in an interview, answer and report; express an opinion and support the opinion with reasons
  • Write: short notes (greeting, apology, thanks, invitation), a personal letter, an impersonal letter (announcement, request, report)
  • Read: comprehend an informative paragraph; an opinion supported by reasons; a short story, general comprehension of a simple poem, or a few biblical verses
  • Listen: comprehend a short dialogue about daily life; generally comprehend a simple song; comprehend a short informative lecture about modern life, tradition and habits

Intermediate Students who complete this level will be able to:

  • Speak: in conversation on any topic
  • Write: forming tables from text, personal or historical chronological report, theoretical analysis of reasons, results, and purposes
  • Read: Press releases and articles in journalistic style in elementary Hebrew, short story partially adapted to elementary Hebrew, general comprehension-based on key words, syntactic structures, and morphology-of poetry, midrashim, or biblical verses
  • Listen: Listen: general understanding of simple TV or radio news, comprehension of dialogue in standard Hebrew, comprehension of the main ideas of a simple song based on a single hearing

Hebrew IV–Grade 12

Readings are assigned from recent newspaper articles and students are asked to write a critical summary about the issues being addressed in these articles. Piyyutim (religious poems) from the liturgy are studied, and short stories written by such authors as Yehuda Amichai, Amnon Shamosh, and Yehuda Borla are discussed. Issues facing Israelis are researched and discussed in class. Students prepare presentations to their junior classmates on Yom HaShoah, Yom HaZikaron, and Yom HaAtzmaut.

History - AP U.S. Government (Political Science)–Grade 12

This course will provide an advanced understanding of how today’s American government functions. This will not only include its formal structure, but also the impact of political parties, media, electorate and interest groups on policy — both domestic and foreign.

Before beginning studying contemporary politics, students will read selections from the works of John Locke and other political philosophers who were major influences on the Founding Fathers. To understand the premises which guided the Framers of the Constitution, students will also read selections from the Federalist Papers.

Wherever possible, the class will have the opportunity to compare American politics with relevant aspects of Jewish law and history (as for example, Constitutional Law and the <em>Halachic</em> process).  The second semester will provide opportunities to compare the American system of government with that of other countries including Israel.

Student projects during the year will include:

  1. Analyzing data on the relative weights of the individual states in the Electoral College and developing a winning strategy for a hypothetical candidate
  2. Developing a case for specific legislation on behalf of an interest group
  3. Analyzing significantly differing accounts of the same public policy issue in two publications.

 

History - AP U.S. History–Grade 11

This course covers the period of time from the American colonial settlement until the “Reagan Revolution” in the 1980s. It is a historiographical survey of the major events of this time period.  As such, we will study how historians have looked at the events of this time period from cultural, economic, ideological angles. We will be evaluating their approaches, arguments, and methodology debate the interpretation of each period.

We will also reviewing and practicing strategies for the AP exam, which is a requirement for this course.

History - United States History–Grade 11

The course covers the development of the United States from the thirteen colonies to the present. The course proceeds in chronological order, although a major focus is the recognition that all members of American society did not always experience the same major events in the same way. The primary goal for the course is to have students see the connection between the past and present, how contemporary issues reflect long standing historical causes. Students study major current events to facilitate this understanding. Other goals include learning about the study of history. A recounting of the past is never a simple linear story. Explanations for historical events must account for a variety of factors and while the course separates these individual strands, it is important to see how forces worked together to produce this nation's story. Major political events form the basis for each unit but each includes relevant and crucial economic, social, and intellectual issues. Students examine the major 'myths' of American history, explore their persistence, and try to understand why these exaggerations, half-truths, and outright lies have secured their place in our national psyche. Finally, students will explore those themes that pervade American history. Students work to master the expository analytic essay and complete a major research paper (Core and Honors). Students read a variety of primary and secondary sources, including a brief introduction to the major historical scholarship of each era.

History - Western Civilization I (to 1500)–Grade 9

This survey course traces the rise and fall of the major civilizations of the ancient world through the European Renaissance. It is a chronological and conceptual course focusing on common concepts of history such as government, the individual versus the group, cultural exchange and the expulsion/dispersal of people. Skill development includes the use of primary source material, independent research, and analytical thesis writing. The text, supplementary sources and special projects deepen the understanding of past and present events, and promote critical thinking. The course is coordinated with Jewish History I in terms of content, skills, and assignments to develop a more complete understanding of the place of Jewish history within Western Civilization.

History - Western Civilization II (1500 to the present)–Grade 10

This course is a continuation of the ninth grade course, beginning with the Reformation and continuing to the present. Essential to this study is the rise of Western Europe into a position of global dominance through trade as well as the exploration of the decline of the church and rise of the nation state. Students study the major developments in Science, Religion, Economics, Politics, Philosophy, and International Relations to see how these forces worked together to bring historical change. Thematic issues of social change, the role of the individual, the rise of mass movements, and the link between past and present will inform the chronological progression of the course material. Students will read widely in secondary, primary and literary sources to enhance their understanding of the material. They will continue to work to refine research and writing skills. The course is coordinated with Jewish History II in terms of content, skills, and assignments to develop a more complete understanding of the place of Jewish history within Western Civilization.

History through the Arts–Grade 12

This course, offered at the Honors level, is designed as a seminar in which students will gain an appreciation for the ways in which various art forms provide resource materials for the study of history and culture. The class will focus on understanding the artist as a representation of, as well as a reaction to, his/her society. Students will be exposed to a variety of creative media and use their knowledge and research skills from previous years to create theories about specific artists and art forms. This course focuses on aspects of US history.

Students are expected to take an active role in the presentation of course material.

Jewish History I (to 1500)–Grade 9

This course is a survey of Jewish history during the Rabbinic and Medieval periods. The central focus of the course is the experience of the Jews during the period in Christian Europe and in areas under Muslim domination. Major social, economic, intellectual, and political developments are examined as are the contributions of major personalities such as Saadiah Gaon, Rashi, Rambam, Maharam of Rothenberg.

In addition to the transmission of the history of this period, other goals include: the development of historical thinking, which involves an appreciation of continuity and change, an acquaintance with concepts important to historical thinking, and an appreciation of the impact of human decision-making on history. Other important goals include the development of an understanding of how the historian works and the communication of values and attitudes.

Elements of this course include lecture, class discussion, library research, role-playing, and analysis of primary source texts.

Jewish History II (1500-present)–Grade 10

This course is a survey of the history of the Jews during the modern period. After some preliminary discussion of major developments from 1492-1750, the course will be divided into two sections. The first section deals with the period from 1750 to the Balfour Declaration, including Emancipation and the Haskalah, movements for religious reform, the emergence of Hasidism, modern anti-Semitism, and Zionism. The second section deals with the Holocaust including European Jewry between the wars, the Jew in Nazi ideology, stages of Nazi anti-Jewish policy, emigration, ghettoization, extermination, the Judenrate, Jewish resistance, the Allied reaction to the Holocaust and Faith after the Holocaust. Students will complete a joint research project for these two courses and produce a term paper.

Jewish Thought and Prayer–Grade 11

We will examine for the first half of the year the underlying dynamics and philosophies of Tefillah (praying.) In conjunction with the course, Biurei Ha’Tefillah (Clarifications of Prayer), we will read various rabbinic scholars who will challenge our sensibilities about how we perceive the world and discover how prayer can deeply affect our perceptions on various levels. Traditional and modern scholars will be discussed during the first semester. This course is designed to engage the student to delve deeper into the nature of prayer and each student is encouraged to bring their passion for learning into every classroom discussion.

For the second half of the year we will explore how the halachic system was developed in a way, that at first glance seems counter-intuitive, that helps us merge our personal and communal obligations and desires with the Almighty. Relying mostly on Rav Soloveitchik’s writings, we will analyze the beauty and complexity of the halachic system and how we can engage it in a meaningful way for our times. There is a sourcebook that is required reading for our class that was masterfully composed by Rabbi Dovid Shapiro. This class meets once a week for the entire year.

Justice–Grade 11

This course will explore the complexities of fairness through the lens of key court cases and recent legal controversies. Our goal is to identify the core values that underlie seemingly intractable legal positions by making connections with students' experiences as young adults. In addition, students will develop expertise in a number of areas of the law and will share with their peers as well as other audiences.

Mathematics - Algebra 1–Grade 9

This course is a continuation of eighth grade Algebra I, for those who need it.

Mathematics - Algebra 1/II–Grade 9

This course completes the study of Algebra I and starts the study of Algebra II.

Mathematics - Algebra II–Grade 11

The traditional course in Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry begins with a review of Algebra I and extends the students' knowledge in such topics as properties of real numbers, polynomials, solutions of simultaneous equations, radicals, quadratic equations, complex numbers, inequalities, exponential equations, and a wide spectrum of algebraic word problems. In some classes, trigonometry, logarithms, conic sections, matrices, sequences and series, and solving higher order equations are also covered.

Mathematics - Algebra II–Grade 9

The traditional course in Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry begins with a review of Algebra I and extends the students' knowledge in such topics as properties of real numbers, polynomials, solutions of simultaneous equations, radicals, quadratic equations, complex numbers, inequalities, exponential equations, and a wide spectrum of algebraic word problems. In some classes, trigonometry, logarithms, conic sections, matrices, sequences and series, and solving higher order equations are also covered.

Mathematics - AP Calculus AB/BC–Grade 12

This is a college level mathematics course that is equivalent to the first course in calculus offered in colleges. This course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra, geometry, trigonometry and properties of functions as studied in a pre-calculus course. Topics include: properties of elementary functions—algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic; limits; differential and integral calculus. All theorems are proven and many problems of a practical and theoretical nature are solved.Calculus BC is a full-year course in the calculus of functions of a single variable. It includes all topics taught in Calculus AB plus additional topics, but both courses are intended to be challenging and demanding; they require a similar depth of understanding of common topics.

Mathematics - AP Calculus BC–Grade 12

This college level course is equivalent to the first year of college calculus. All topics covered in Calculus AB are also covered here. Additional topics covered include: sequences and series, parametric equations, polar functions and differential equations. This course is considerably more rigorous and theoretical than the AB course. This course is given only when there are sufficient numbers of qualified students.

Mathematics - Calculus–Grade 12

This course is designed for students who have completed Algebra II and Trigonometry and who want to continue traditional mathematics without taking an AP course. The course takes up the essentials of differential and integral calculus, with emphasis on techniques and applications rather than theory.

Mathematics - Pre-Calculus–Grade 11

This course develops a thorough understanding of functions, sequences and series. The emphasis is on developing the concepts which form the foundations of calculus, such as the concepts of limits and continuity, with substantial practice in the development and understanding of ä - å proofs. There is a careful study of polynomials, with real as well as complex coefficients, supported by the use of graphing calculators. Probability, matrices, transformational geometry, and logarithmic functions are other topics dealt with during the course.

Mathematics -- Discrete Mathematics–Grade 12

Discrete mathematics involves the study of countable objects. It typically addresses real-world problems that call for the determination of whether a solution exists, and, if so, whether there is more than one solution and which one is optimal. Discrete mathematics is essential to fields such as operations research, resource optimization, group decision-making, and computer science. The major topics covered in this course will be election theory, fair division, graph theory, game theory, and combinatorics. 

Navi–Grade 10

This is the first class in which our students encounter Biblical poetry in a significant way with Sefer Yishayahu. An introductory unit highlights the structure and method of such poetry. Sefer Yishayahu is also our students’ first serious foray into N’vi’im Acharonim. Thus, another introductory unit focuses on the multiple roles of a prophet, and an exploration of classical Jewish texts on the nature of prophecy.

Yishayahu served during the reigns of four kings of Judah. Accordingly, the historical Tanach texts which treat this era (Melachim Bet and Divrei HaYamim Bet) are examined in tandem with- and to shed light upon- the richness of Yishayahu’s prophetic message. Students learn to recognize repeating themes in the text, and gain understanding of such critical topics as Social Justice, Repentance, Divine Providence, Reward and Punishment, and the Messianic Age.

Navi–Grade 11

Texts: Yirmiyahu, Tzefaniya, Eicha and Tehillim 137. The choice of texts will span from a few years before Yirmiyahu begins his career as a prophet, to the devastation of the Churban and the first glimpses of Bnei Yisrael arriving on the shores of their new home in Bavel.

The goal of this course is to continue to develop the students' exegetical and literary skills in Navi study. This is the first time our students will encounter one of the major Nevi'im Achronim which is a unique mix of prose and poetry. Some time is spent introducing our students formally to the beauty of biblical poetry. This is the basis for the next two years of study of Classical Prophets. The nature of prophecy is explored in a more sophisticated manner than they have studied until now. Yirmiyahu's very personal portrayal of the suffering and joys of prophecy engage the students to explore the complex role of classical Navi. The relevance of the prophetic message to our time is addressed in the courses in themes such as spiritual alienation, over emphasis of ritual. The students read Eicha with an eye to understanding the grieving process that the nation is going through and how through this sefer they emerge religiously intact and ultimately stronger. The genre of Kinnah is learned as well as an example of a more in depth look at biblical poetry.

Navi–Grade 12

This course focuses on the book of Ezra-Nechemia which discusses the return of the Jews to their land after the destruction of the 1st Temple and their efforts to rebuild the Temple and the land. We fill out the larger picture of the time period by studying the works of the prophets of this time period -- Chagai and Zecharia. We delve into the struggles and triumphs of the people of this generation -- both physical ones and spiritual ones. We reflect upon the challenge and decision of many who returned to the land of Israel, and discuss the relevance of this model to the modern state of Israel. The text in general beocomes the start of a conversation about religious obstacles that students will face as they encounter the world around them, and ways to stay strong and connected through those challenging circumstances, as the Jewish people of this time period.

 

Navi–Grade 9

Texts: Yona, Melachim Beit, select passages from Divrei HaYamim, Megillat Ruth and Megillat Esther. Students study the narrative of the events leading up to the destruction of the first Beit HaMikdash. The goal is to introduce the students to the text of nevi'im achronim (the later prophets), and to provide them with the historical foundation for such study. Students are assigned to translate and explain some of the comments of the meforshim.

Philosophy of Maimonides–Grade 12

This course will examine the Rambam's philosophy and approach to the world through a close inspection of his writings. Students will consider both the approach of Maimonides to a wide variety of questions and also whether those approaches reflect a consensus of Jewish scholars or not. Topics to be studies include: creation, miracles and nature, prophecy, the afterlife and the world to come, reading the Bible as literature, anthropomorphism, tradition, Noachide law, the purpose of Mitzvot, Jewish political theory and other topics.

Psychology–Grade 12

This course provides an overview of the art and science of psychology.  In the first semester, students will survey all aspects of basic psychology: from the neurons of the brain to the memory of the mind; from the developmental psychology that relates to children, to the social psychology that is crucial to teenagers, to the psychopathologies that afflict the old.  In the second semester, the class will give more time to in-depth discussion and consideration of issues in psychology that are of special interest to the students including topics like the psychology of religion, psychology of happiness, and freedom of choice.

Science - AP Biology–Grade 12

The Advanced Placement Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory biology course taken by biology majors during their first year of college. The topics covered are similar to those covered in ninth grade biology. AP biology differs significantly with respect to the range and depth of these topics, the kind of textbook used, and the kind of laboratory experiments that are done. As an example, both courses have a laboratory studying photosynthesis. Ninth grade biology assesses photosynthesis qualitatively, using the change of color of a pH indicator. AP biology assesses photosynthesis quantitatively, using a spectrophotometer to measure color changes of a reducing agent. Permission of the instructor is required for enrollment.

Science - AP Chemistry–Grade 12

This course is designed to investigate advanced topics in chemistry. Students wishing to take this course must demonstrate honors-level work in biology and chemistry. Students who do honors-level work in the course may take the Advanced Placement examination in May. Specific topics include: classification of matter; chemical reactions; thermo-chemistry; atomic structure; periodic property of elements; chemical thermodynamics and others. Permission of the instructor is required for enrollment.

Science - Biology–Grade 9

This course provides students with a working knowledge of biological processes and principles. Areas covered include the major concepts of biology:

  • Basic chemistry, organic chemistry, metabolism, and enzymes.
  • Cell anatomy, osmosis, photosynthesis, cell respiration, cell reproduction, genetics, and protein synthesis.
  • Evolution and classification.
  • Survey of microorganisms, fungi, plants, and animals.
  • Human biology. 
  • Ecology

Laboratory work emphasizes the concepts introduced in class and the scientific method.

Science - Chemistry–Grade 10

Through discussion and laboratory experiences, the course exposes students to concepts in matter and energy: bonding; molecular and atomic structure; the periodic tables; solids, liquids and gases; kinetics and equilibrium; electrochemistry; organic chemistry and the application of principles of reaction. The laboratory program is used to demonstrate physical properties and introduces students to quantitative chemical measurements and analyses. The course emphasizes scientific reasoning and its exploratory processes.

Science - Physics –Grade 11

This advanced course conveys the basic concepts of classical and modern physics. The student is made aware that there are unifying principles in mechanical and nuclear physics, electricity and magnetism, light, sound and thermodynamics. Other topics include: measurement, force, energy, motion, heat and wave motion.

Seminar Course: Life Issues–Grade 12

This seminar, which meets once weekly over the course of the senior year, introduces the students to halakhic and aggadic (legal and philosophical) texts pertaining to the following themes: husband-wife relationships, generally; taharat ha-mishpacha, specifically; death and mourning; the quest for taamei mitzvot (seeking personal meaning and fulfillment in the observance of mitzvot). The sources serve as a springboard for discussion; questions are encouraged, and characteristically determine ad hoc modifications to the syllabus.

Spanish –Grade 10

Beginner-intermediate level course which builds on the skills learned in 9th grade. Sophormore Spanish focuses still on building vocabulary but also requires the students to use the target language more in class. The language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening continue to be taught, but writing longer thematic pieces and comprehending material in context take a more prominent role.

At the end of the course, students will be able to converse, ask and answer questions about classroom rules and behaviors, good study habits, extra-curricular activities, special events and celebrations, the family and daily routines, etc. They will be able to discuss and compare tastes in clothing and talk about shopping, fashion, styles, and trends.

Students will be capable of giving and taking directions to get to places; they will be able to discuss good driving habits.

The fundamentals of grammar continue to be introduced, so students will be able to converse using the present and preterit tense of regular and irregular verbs. They will be able to discriminate between ser and estar correctly. They will be able to use possessive and demonstrative adjectives, the present progressive, direct object pronouns, and affirmative commands in their conversation and written work.

By the end of this course, students will be able to read, comprehend, and learn historical and cultural facts from beginner-intermediate level short stories in the target language. They will come out with a greater understanding of the Hispanic culture.

Spanish–Grade 11

This intermediate level course builds on the skills learned in past grades. Junior Spanish focuses less on building vocabulary and more on learning to use that vocabulary in real life situations. The language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening continue to be taught.

At the end of the course, students will be able to converse, ask and answer questions about holiday celebrations and family traditions. They will be able to discuss and compare their childhood memories, likes and dislikes.

Students will be capable of describing people, places, and situations in the past; they’ll be able to talk about emergencies, including accidents, injuries, and treatments, rescues and heroes. They’ll feel comfortable discussing TV shows, movie plots and characters. They will come out with a greater understanding of the Hispanic culture and what it has to offer.

Grammar continues to play an important role, so students will be able to tell stories using and discriminating between the preterite tense, including irregular and stem-changing verbs, and the imperfect tense. They will be able to talk about reciprocal actions correctly; they’ll feel comfortable using direct and indirect object pronouns and the present perfect tense.

Spanish –Grade 12

This intermediate-advanced level course builds on the skills learned in past grades and focuses much more on fluency and speaking. The language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening continue to be taught with a bigger emphasis on conversation, practicality and every day life.

At the end of the course, students will be able to converse, ask and answer questions about the arts and artists, including musicians, actors, painters, and sculptors. They will be able to discuss the lives and work of various Hispanic artists and famous personalities.

Students will be capable of narrating an event in the past in detail. They’ll feel comfortable talking about emotions, and giving advice about health and nutritional practices; they’ll be able to talk and express opinions about symptoms and consider remedies.

By the end of this course the students will be able to talk about many topics of interest, even if they can’t use the specific vocabulary; by now they will have the confidence and enough resources to be able to explain themselves, either by finding synonyms or in some other way.

Grammar takes a secondary role to conversing and writing proficiency, but it still plays an important part in the course. Students will be able to converse more confidently using the Present, but also the Imperfect and the Preterit correctly when telling a story in the past; they will also be able to use the Past participle, and give and respond to affirmative and negative commands. The Subjunctive mode will be introduced, so students will be able to talk about wishes, dreams, etc.

By the end of the year the students will have an appreciation for the Hispanic culture and everything it has to offer. They will also be closer to becoming better citizens of the world.

Spanish–Grade 9

This course builds on the skills learned in 8th grade. Spanish 9 focuses still on building vocabulary but also requires the students to use the target language more in class. The language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening continue to be taught.

At the end of the course, students will be able to converse, ask and answer questions about school and extra-curricular activities, the community, family, places and leisure activities, colors, etc. They will be able to communicate some of their feelings and needs and understand others.

Students will be capable of extending, accepting/declining invitations, describing events and family celebrations, their house and household chores to others. They will feel comfortable ordering a simple meal in a restaurant.

The fundamentals of grammar continue to be introduced, so students will be able to converse using the present tense of regular verbs, including some stem-changing and some irregular verbs. They will be able to use possessive adjectives and affirmative tú commands in their conversation. Students will also be able to use and distinguish between ser/estar correctly. Students will have a greater understanding of Hispanic culture.

Studio Art–Grades 9 & 10

Fundamentals of two-dimensional art including form, color, line, composition and balance will be explored through use of different media and subject matter. There will be weekly homework assignments in a sketchbook.

Studio Art -- Independent Study–Grades 11 & 12

Students will be required to submit proposals of works that they would like to create over the course of the year. Students will have access to the art room and materials and will receive mentoring. Works will be critiqued as a group. Juniors may use this class as an opportunity to create a portfolio for submission to post-grad art programs while seniors may do their senior thesis as part of this class. Weekly entries in a sketchbook will be expected.

Talmud–Grade 10

The entire Upper School learns the same Mesechet in a given year. The Mesechet is chosen by the Talmud department and each grade learns it with a different focus. There is general and consistent skill development in the areas of reading, translating, and comprehension. In addition to the Gemarathat each class will cover, each grade has an individual focus for the year.

In 10th grade, students explain the path of the Halacha from the Gemara to the Shulchan Aruch and will be able to identify and navigate the Shulchan Aruch and the Mishnah Torah.

Talmud–Grade 11

The entire Upper School learns the same Mesechet in a given year. The Mesechet is chosen by the Talmud department and each grade learns it with a different focus. There is general and consistent skill development in the areas of reading, translating, and comprehension. In addition to the Gemarathat each class will cover, each grade has an individual focus for the year.

In 11th grade, students develop the necessary skills to learn key Rishonim. Students will be able to read, translate and explain 10 selections from key Rishonim such as the Ritva and Rashba.

Talmud–Grade 12

The entire Upper School learns the same Mesechet in a given year. The Mesechet is chosen by the Talmud department and each grade learns it with a different focus. There is general and consistent skill development in the areas of reading, translating, and comprehension. In addition to the Gemarathat each class will cover, each grade has an individual focus for the year.

In 12th grade, students develop the necessary skills to learn She'alot and teshuvot and will be able to read, translate and explain four.

Talmud–Grade 9

The entire Upper School learns the same Mesechet in a given year. The Mesechet is chosen by the Talmud department and each grade learns it with a different focus. There is general and consistent skill development in the areas of reading, translating, and comprehension. In addition to the Gemara that each class will cover, each grade has an individual focus for the year.

In 9th grade, students learn the necessary skills to learn Tosefot and will be able to read, translate and explain 10 Tosefot.

The Minority Experience in America–Grade 12

This course will look at the wide and varied experiences of both ethnic and economic minority groups in American History. Among the groups to be studied will be women, African-Americans, Irish, Mexican-Americans, Japanese-Americans, Chinese, Hmong, homeless and the working poor. This class will be reading-intensive due to the numerous historical sources used.